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Posts of category  "Snowboarding"

EL DORADO COUNTY (CBS13) – An Orangevale man who was killed while snowboarding in South Lake Tahoe last week has been identified.

On Thursday, David Karlin, 23, was pronounced dead after a snowboarding accident in South Lake Tahoe, according to a Placer County Shierff’s Department statement.

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PORTAGE, Wis. – Temperatures are finally cold enough for Wisconsin’s ski season to begin. The staff at Cascade Mountain is hoping the winter air will make the resort’s latest investment worth it.

It purchased 40 snow guns this year in preparation for this year’s ski season. That’s on top of 40 guns purchased last year, bringing its total number of snow guns to nearly 400.

“That’s over a million dollars a year just in increasing our snowmaking because with the iffy weather we get here in southern Wisconsin, snowmaking is really important,” Randy Axelson, Cascade Mountain marketing director, said.

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Sgt. Collin J. Zak was killed in a snowboarding accident at Monarch Ski Area, Colo. on Dec. 2, 2017.


SALIDA, Colo. — A snowboarder killed when he hit a tree at a Colorado ski area was a 23-year-old soldier from Ohio.

The Chaffee County Sheriff’s Office says Sgt. Collin J. Zak of North Royalton was found unresponsive Saturday morning on the expert-rated Mirage run at the Monarch Ski Area. Ski patrollers performed CPR, but Zak was pronounced dead at the scene.

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It’s November and the snows are just starting to fall in the USA so it’s understandable the country’s skiers are a bit rusty.

So it is little wonder footage is emerging of a mountain of meaty fails as the crew find their ski legs again.

This was shot over the first few weeks of November in Oregon.

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CITY shoppers can head to the slopes next weekend as the Old George Mall plays host to the Salisbury Slalom with a snowboarding challenge.

On November 25 city centre visitors will have the chance to go head to head in the mall’s very own skiing-themed event to win prizes and get their name on the leader board.

Manager at Old George Mall Jon Osgood said: “It is going to be a fantastic day of snowboarding fun next weekend and we’re expecting a flurry of people.

“This summer, we hosted a tennis serve challenge to celebrate Wimbledon and it was a huge success with hundreds of people taking part, so to get everybody ready for winter we thought ski slope fun with Salisbury Slalom would be perfect.

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Doug Palladini, the current Global Brand President of Vans, past editor of SNOWBOARDER Magazine. p: Trevor Graves

A comprehensive retrospective from the former Editors of SNOWBOARDER Magazine, originally published in the 30th Anniversary Issue of SNOWBOARDER Magazine, pick up your copy now!

Words by Doug Palladini- Current Global Brand President of Vans

On my first day of work as Associate Editor for SNOWBOARDER Magazine in 1989 (I was the magazine’s first dedicated employee), I met Powder Magazine editor Casey Sheehan in the Las Vegas Hilton lobby as the SIA Show was about to begin. He was already late for a meeting. “Here’s your badge. I’ll see you at five for beers. Have a good day,” he said. Casey shoved my credential and a battered folder into my hands and quickly disappeared into the huddling trade show masses. This was all well and good, except that I had no idea whatsoever what I was doing.

Fresh from San Diego State’s School of Journalism, having ridden a snowboard once in my life up to that point, I was recklessly unprepared to assume any level of magazine stewardship, let alone the awesome responsibility of running the thing, soup to nuts. But ignorance was my ally on that day, and not knowing just how humorously overmatched I was for the task at hand, I steadied myself and marched into the convention hall. What I recall of those first few days was a humbling mix of derision from the staffs of existing snowboard magazines such as TransWorld Snowboarding and ISM, a powerful education from the likes of Tom Sims, Jake Burton and Chuck Barfoot (all of whom worked their own trade show stands), even more derision from pompous, douchey ski brands such as Lange and Rossignol, and an overwhelming sense of inspiration that I was on the burning fuse end of a business/sport/culture powder keg ready to explode.

Snowboarder's first employee, Doug Palladini. p: Trevor Graves

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SINGAPORE – I have never seen snow, and the prospect of falling headfirst into snow chills me.
So when I walked into Urban Ski at Millenia Walk, I was pleasantly surprised to realise that it was a comfortably cool environment, and no snow  was in sight.
Instead, the adjustable ski slope is covered with a layer of nylon carpet that is sprayed with water to mimic the smoothness of snow.
The slope at Urban Ski, which opened in July 2015, is essentially a giant treadmill that simulate a downhill motion.  I am told it’s easier and better to learn skiing indoors, as feedback can be given immediately.
For a start, I was given tips on how to stand and hold onto the bar in front of me, but I definitely wasn’t prepared for the sudden jerk when the slope began to move. Thank goodness I held on to the bar, tight.
In time, I recovered my composure, stayed on my feet and got the hang of skiing on the slope.
The tough part came at the snowboarding segment. Having both legs bound to a board made it extremely difficult to manoeuvre.
At the end of the 30-minute session, I felt like I had just done a full body workout, along with all the aches and pains.

 (Editor’s note: This post is part of our Dispatches Detours continuing series of travel stories about unconventional destinations accessible to Europe-based expatsTerry Boyd also contributed to this post, which has been updated with new information.)


For many American expats, and even Brits and Europeans, Eastern Europe is terra incognito.

cherveno_zname_ski_run1446545745But as Dispatches found out earlier this year, Bulgariaand other countries such as Romania have a lot to offer, especially to adventurous expat travelers in Europe broadening their horizons.

One thing is for certain: Southeastern European ski resorts are well worth checking out for 2017.

For example, Bulgaria offers some of the best skiing in Europe at resorts that are sophisticated yet affordable. And, because they’re so far south, Bulgarian mountains get significant moisture that guarantees snowfalls between sunny days.

For example, right Switzerland is pretty much snow-free as of early January. But starting 6 January, a blizzard swept through Bulgaria and Romania dumping up to 60 centimeters (2 feet) of fresh snow. Yet another reason to check out Bulgarian resorts in 2017.

The largest and most developed ski resorts in Bulgaria are Bansko, Borovets and Pamporovo. The resorts draw skiers from all over Europe, but Brits seem to make up the largest single visitor category.

Bulgaria has some of Europe’s sunniest slopes, cheapest prices and friendliest locals.


Borovets is the oldest and biggest international mountain resort in Bulgaria. It’s located at 1,350 meters above sea level (with highest pistes at 2,600 meters), on the Northern slopes of Rila Mountain. The location is famous for the surrounding pine woods at the foot of Mt. Mousala (2,925 meters), the highest mountain on the Balkan peninsula.

Borovets is easily accessible to the main airport in Sofia, the capital and largest city, at about 70 kilometers, and 126 kilometers from second-city Plovdiv, which also has an airport.

From the Borovets website:

The total length of the ski pistes is 58 km. The ski runs vary in difficulty. The pistes are grouped in 3 ski centers: pistes of Sitnyakovo – Martinovi Baraki region; 4 pistes of Markudjik region and 3 pistes of Yastrebets region. The best ski slopes are those of Yastrebets ski center where all winter sports competitions take place.

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